THE BEST DIET OF ALL TIME

What’s the best diet?

As a fitness professional, one question I hear all the time is, “which diet or nutrition plan do you recommend for best results?”

“Is it Paleo? Vegan? Intermittent fasting? Should I detox first?” etc etc etc

Everyone wants to know the “secret diet” for best results.

Let me share the secret: there is NO secret or ‘best’ diet. I know that may sound upsetting and maybe you don’t quite believe me when you read this but let me explain why.

Everyone of us is so different. You and I have many differences, as do you and everyone else in this world. Just to prove this is true, here are just a few differences many of us have:

• Body type: Some are tall and thin; others short and stocky. Or everything in between.

• Fitness level and body composition: Some are active, strong, lean, and dense. Some have been sedentary for the last 50 years and may be frail, without a lot of muscle.

• Dietary preferences and exclusions: Whether kosher or halal; plant-based or carnivore; scavenger or “picky eater”; iron stomach or “allergic to everything”, we all have a vast range of food preferences and many reasons for them.

• Budget: Some of us might be struggling students, some are middle-class families trying to make ends meet, or highly paid executives — maybe even a pro athlete.

• Organic / conventional: Some of us live on boxed and packaged foods. Some try to read labels, sometimes. Some of us may choose only kale that has been lovingly grown by a sect of Californian monks who hand-pluck the bugs off.

• Nutrition knowledge and diet history: Some of us will be faithful followers of a certain dietary practice, or a history of trying different diets. Others have very little nutrition knowledge at all.

• Time: Some of us have an open schedule, ready for any kind of health and fitness project. Others have a crowded daily schedule and countless conflicting priorities.

• Ethnic background and heritage: I work with clients all over the world. A meal or cuisine that suits your lifestyle may not suit someone who lives in another country or distant state, city or town.

• Age: As we age, our metabolisms change, our food tolerances and appetites change, and our digestive abilities change. You get the picture.

So when someone asks me what the ‘best’ diet is out there…it depends on each and every one of us and the differences we have.

You can be healthy and fit whether you eat mostly meat or mostly veggies, mostly fat or mostly carbohydrates, many times a day or just a few times, and so on. When working with a client, I ask them to track their foods for a few days and then we review the foods they enjoy most and how to make their meals work for them in reaching their goals; while not making them feel deprived of what they enjoy about their favorite foods.

What do they need to be their best?

GOOD NUTRITION IS MORE SIMILAR THAN DIFFERENT.

You might be wondering:

How can such varied diets all keep people fit and healthy? Well, despite their differences, most effective nutrition programs are more alike than different. Here’s how:

1. Good nutrition asks people to care about their food and eating.
Research shows that your actual choices are probably less important than simply paying better attention to what you eat. When you really care about what you eat, and make mindful, deliberate choices, you almost inevitably eat better.

2. Good nutrition focuses on food quality.
Almost no decent diet plan asks you to eat more processed, nutrient-depleted pseudo-food. Instead, pretty much every plan recommends eating whole, minimally processed, nutrient rich foods — foods that our body has a longstanding relationship with.
Regardless of the macronutrient breakdowns or specific choices, just eating better quality food will improve most of our health significantly.

3. Good nutrition helps eliminate nutrient deficiencies.
When we care about what we eat, choose foods mindfully, and try to get the best-quality foods we can afford, we usually get lots of valuable nutrients as a bonus. Many times, when people start a certain diet program, they just start eating better overall. They get more nutrients.
They may get more variety.
Or fresher foods.
Or less-processed foods.
Or foods they chose mindfully. Because of these factors, they feel better. And that’s one reason they start making wild claims about the rejuvenating power of their new diet. They didn’t do anything special, really. They often just started getting what their bodies needed.

4. Good nutrition helps control appetite and food intake. For most people, “it’s hard to eat just one” of the hyper-addictive deliciousness of processed foods. We often keep eating and eating them, but never feel satisfied.

We may also eat them on the go, when we’re rushed and busy.

So not only are we eating foods that encourage us to eat more of them, we’re not even really paying attention to the experience at all.

On the other hand, when we’re more aware of what we’re eating; choose a variety of more satisfying, higher-quality foods; and eliminate nutrient deficiencies, we almost always end up eating less food overall.

We feel more satisfied — both physiologically and psychologically.

We lose fat, gain muscle, and perform better. Notice that you don’t need calorie counting here.

Focusing on food awareness and food quality is usually enough for people to tune into their own hunger and appetite. That means calorie control without the annoying calorie math. (cuz I don’t love math) 🙂

5. Good nutrition promotes regular exercise.
When you start paying attention to what you are eating, you usually start thinking about physical activity too.
Or vice versa: If you take up an activity you love, eventually you start wondering if your nutrition could help you do that activity better.

Good nutrition fits with regular activity like a key into a lock. And most nutrition programs suggest that people exercise along with eating well.

Hopefully this information helped you understand the basis of a good meal plan and that most of them are more similar than we think.

If you need help with your meal planning, shoot me an email today: kathyprofitness@gmail.com

Gluten Free Craze – Have you considered it?

Have you considered going gluten free?

One thing that makes me crazy is when I hear clients decide to follow the newest and latest fads because they have heard someone say that it’s the next “best thing” out there.
Really???

Let me take you back…back to a time, (if you are old enough to remember)to the 1990’s – when it was popular to eat low fat and high carbs. Remember that awesomeness? Yes, I do too. :p
Since then, our obesity in the US became an epidemic.

Coincidence? I don’t believe so.

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Once that craziness ended, then it was all about the Atkins diet and that had been originally popular in the 70s!! Carbs became the “bad guys” as proteins and fats were the secret to our success.

Or was it?

It’s addictive to think we can just cut out one food group and live happily ever after and now this popular fad is “gluten”.

Let’s begin with what gluten even is:
It’s a mixture of proteins found in wheat, barley and rye.

It’s true that gluten can be bad for some people. But it’s not a “diet” phase in any way.

People who suffer with Celiac disease have discomfort and fatigue and gastrointestinal issues. There are other conditions were choosing to eliminate gluten containing foods can help reduce symptoms and discomfort.

This has lead to more gluten free products being sold and now, a new diet phase emerged.

People who remove gluten from their diets notice, at first, that they feel less bloated. This is usually believed to be “weight loss”, as the scale shows a drop (and why I don’t allow my clients to simply refer to the scale for success. It isn’t accurate most of the time).

 

Binge and Move On Already!!!

Bloating can release due to the initial removal of gluten from one’s diet since it contains less fiber. Fiber attracts water for digestion purposes and this may cause some temporary bloating. Take away more fiber, take away the bloat.

This is an example of what we think is happening (IE: weight loss) is really another cause altogether (less water in the body temporarily).

Now there are ridiculous amounts of foods being manufactured as “gluten free”. I have to caution you here because manufacturers will advertise foods as “gluten free” when they had never even contained gluten in the beginning! Don’t fall for these scams!

Let’s talk about what needs to happen to something in order to make it “gluten free”- when it contains gluten. It requires heavy amounts of processing. It’s during the processing phase, that many of the vitamins and minerals are lost and leaves many foods with very little nutritional value. As fiber is now lost, many B vitamins are also lost.

Gluten-free breads now contain almost 1/3 less the amount of protein as gluten options and instead contain twice the amount of fats and that is made mostly up of saturated fats.

So should you consider going gluten-free? Only if you suffer from symptoms that can be eliminated from cutting out gluten. Not for weight loss.

What are those symptoms? Do you suffer regularly from:

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Gas – Bloating – Diarrhea – Constipation – Foggy mind – ADHD behavior – Depression – Abdominal pains – Headaches – Bone or joint pains – Chronic fatigue – and some other symptoms that can be diagnosed by a physician. If you are worried about your symptoms, consult your doctor and ask them to run tests for a diagnosis. There is a blood test called the tTG-IgA that is the most accurate to date.

Otherwise, stop looking for the next food fad and eat to fuel your body and goals today!

What are some of the popular diets you’ve tried in the past?