THE BEST DIET OF ALL TIME

What’s the best diet?

As a fitness professional, one question I hear all the time is, “which diet or nutrition plan do you recommend for best results?”

“Is it Paleo? Vegan? Intermittent fasting? Should I detox first?” etc etc etc

Everyone wants to know the “secret diet” for best results.

Let me share the secret: there is NO secret or ‘best’ diet. I know that may sound upsetting and maybe you don’t quite believe me when you read this but let me explain why.

Everyone of us is so different. You and I have many differences, as do you and everyone else in this world. Just to prove this is true, here are just a few differences many of us have:

• Body type: Some are tall and thin; others short and stocky. Or everything in between.

• Fitness level and body composition: Some are active, strong, lean, and dense. Some have been sedentary for the last 50 years and may be frail, without a lot of muscle.

• Dietary preferences and exclusions: Whether kosher or halal; plant-based or carnivore; scavenger or “picky eater”; iron stomach or “allergic to everything”, we all have a vast range of food preferences and many reasons for them.

• Budget: Some of us might be struggling students, some are middle-class families trying to make ends meet, or highly paid executives — maybe even a pro athlete.

• Organic / conventional: Some of us live on boxed and packaged foods. Some try to read labels, sometimes. Some of us may choose only kale that has been lovingly grown by a sect of Californian monks who hand-pluck the bugs off.

• Nutrition knowledge and diet history: Some of us will be faithful followers of a certain dietary practice, or a history of trying different diets. Others have very little nutrition knowledge at all.

• Time: Some of us have an open schedule, ready for any kind of health and fitness project. Others have a crowded daily schedule and countless conflicting priorities.

• Ethnic background and heritage: I work with clients all over the world. A meal or cuisine that suits your lifestyle may not suit someone who lives in another country or distant state, city or town.

• Age: As we age, our metabolisms change, our food tolerances and appetites change, and our digestive abilities change. You get the picture.

So when someone asks me what the ‘best’ diet is out there…it depends on each and every one of us and the differences we have.

You can be healthy and fit whether you eat mostly meat or mostly veggies, mostly fat or mostly carbohydrates, many times a day or just a few times, and so on. When working with a client, I ask them to track their foods for a few days and then we review the foods they enjoy most and how to make their meals work for them in reaching their goals; while not making them feel deprived of what they enjoy about their favorite foods.

What do they need to be their best?

GOOD NUTRITION IS MORE SIMILAR THAN DIFFERENT.

You might be wondering:

How can such varied diets all keep people fit and healthy? Well, despite their differences, most effective nutrition programs are more alike than different. Here’s how:

1. Good nutrition asks people to care about their food and eating.
Research shows that your actual choices are probably less important than simply paying better attention to what you eat. When you really care about what you eat, and make mindful, deliberate choices, you almost inevitably eat better.

2. Good nutrition focuses on food quality.
Almost no decent diet plan asks you to eat more processed, nutrient-depleted pseudo-food. Instead, pretty much every plan recommends eating whole, minimally processed, nutrient rich foods — foods that our body has a longstanding relationship with.
Regardless of the macronutrient breakdowns or specific choices, just eating better quality food will improve most of our health significantly.

3. Good nutrition helps eliminate nutrient deficiencies.
When we care about what we eat, choose foods mindfully, and try to get the best-quality foods we can afford, we usually get lots of valuable nutrients as a bonus. Many times, when people start a certain diet program, they just start eating better overall. They get more nutrients.
They may get more variety.
Or fresher foods.
Or less-processed foods.
Or foods they chose mindfully. Because of these factors, they feel better. And that’s one reason they start making wild claims about the rejuvenating power of their new diet. They didn’t do anything special, really. They often just started getting what their bodies needed.

4. Good nutrition helps control appetite and food intake. For most people, “it’s hard to eat just one” of the hyper-addictive deliciousness of processed foods. We often keep eating and eating them, but never feel satisfied.

We may also eat them on the go, when we’re rushed and busy.

So not only are we eating foods that encourage us to eat more of them, we’re not even really paying attention to the experience at all.

On the other hand, when we’re more aware of what we’re eating; choose a variety of more satisfying, higher-quality foods; and eliminate nutrient deficiencies, we almost always end up eating less food overall.

We feel more satisfied — both physiologically and psychologically.

We lose fat, gain muscle, and perform better. Notice that you don’t need calorie counting here.

Focusing on food awareness and food quality is usually enough for people to tune into their own hunger and appetite. That means calorie control without the annoying calorie math. (cuz I don’t love math) 🙂

5. Good nutrition promotes regular exercise.
When you start paying attention to what you are eating, you usually start thinking about physical activity too.
Or vice versa: If you take up an activity you love, eventually you start wondering if your nutrition could help you do that activity better.

Good nutrition fits with regular activity like a key into a lock. And most nutrition programs suggest that people exercise along with eating well.

Hopefully this information helped you understand the basis of a good meal plan and that most of them are more similar than we think.

If you need help with your meal planning, shoot me an email today: kathyprofitness@gmail.com

Why sugar can make or break your health goals

I know that summer is winding down to a close. I know this because school is already in session. But the weather is still hot and the season is still enticing us with the foods we are choosing to eat and the drinks we drink.
13495658_10209930572691820_8894186879861529774_o
It’s important to understand the who, what, where and how of the foods we eat and how they affect our bodies. I understand the struggle of needing more willpower. But in all actuality, our long term results are not reflected by our short term habits. In order to create long term results, it’s important to understand exactly why we should do what we should do and how to create balance instead of deprivation and overindulging.

When someone suffers from insulin resistance, it means that they have cells that don’t the insulin effectively. The cells then have trouble absorbing the glucose and this causes a buildup of sugars in our blood. When the blood glucose levels are higher than normal (but not quite high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes), the result is a condition known as “pre-diabetes”.

We don’t know exactly why some people develop insulin resistance, while others don’t, but there are a few tell tale signs. One; being overweight or obese are leading factors. Two; being sedentary (lack of movement during the course of every day) can also cause the symptoms that lead to pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes. When you add the two together; overweight and sedentary lifestyle, the risks rise.

So back to my first point about summer and how it ties in with insulin resistance. The summer season brings an abundance of fresh fruits and vegetables, which make it easier to eat healthily but it also brings some risks. Knowing these risks and learning how to deal with them will help our bodies run efficiently and our habits may begin to motivate those around us. #bonus

So what tastes better while lounging around on a lazy summer day than some fruity cocktail drinks and some ice cream treats? I know…pretty tempting, right? Unfortunately, these are dangerous foods for our blood sugar levels. We are simply trading in a few minutes of pleasure (drug like high) when we indulge in these cold and sugar-loaded treats, for a dangerous road that may lead to long term chronic illness.

The danger comes when we choose to continue to indulge in too much sugar, because our bodies respond by producing more and more insulin. When there is too much insulin in our bodies, it trains our cells to become resistant and thus forms the insulin resistance problems.
Now, I realize these facts alone aren’t enough to stop us from eating ice cream and indulging in sugary drinks and snacks…me neither! But moderation is the key to lasting results and long term better health. Still with me? We can have our cake and eat it too…but we also need to be smart about how much we are eating and how we eat it.
One more thing I’d like to mention today to bring this all together. I’m sure you’ve heard about the glycemic index, right? This is simply a way of categorizing foods according to their effects on the levels of glucose in our blood. Pretty cool, right? A food that has a high glycemic index will cause more glucose to build up than a food with low glycemic index.
I know, I know…knowledge is truly powerful!  If we want to help control our blood sugar levels, then we should focus on eating foods with a low glycemic index. It’s also important to note that when we eat foods with a high glycemic index (because I’m all about moderation and not deprivation), just make sure to eat it with a low glycemic food to help slow the effects on our blood sugar levels.
What are high glycemic foods? Think, white flours, white sugars, white rices, and white potatoes. (I know, they are “healthy” but that doesn’t mean they don’t fall into this category).
Low glycemic foods are ones that contain more fiber and protein. Think “clean eating” and you’ll be on the right path. This category includes choices like beans, whole grains, lean proteins and nuts.
1255208_369625306502014_1900918221_n (1)
In conclusion to this information overload (or maybe you already knew all of this), it’s important to follow the 80/20 rule of thumb. Follow a diet full of clean, whole foods 80% of the time and indulge in your favorite treats 20% of the time so you can have the best of both worlds. Being healthy, looking our best and feeling awesome are really great trade offs to cutting out those indulgent periods. Just by becoming more aware of these facts and the glycemic index will help us eat better and reduce stresses on our bodies. When you choose to indulge in a high glycemic treat like ice cream, for example; make sure to enjoy it at the end of a meal that contains low glycemic (clean eating) foods. And a bonus would be to have it on a day when you have done some resistance training.
Screen Shot 2015-01-05 at 10.38.40 PM
As the summer season comes to a close (and really throughout the entire year), have your occasional treats, and make sure they are strictly occasional. Your body and taste buds will thank you in the long run!

Why you might not be hungry in the morning

I bet you have heard the saying, “breakfast is the most important meal of the day” more times than you can count, right? But so many of my clients tell me that they are just not hungry in the morning. It’s a common complaint and there are actually some ways you can change that if you’re one of the non-hungry types, first thing in the morning.

Let’s start some common issues as we are rushing out the door in the morning. First of all, it’s not uncommon for many people to actually feel nauseous first thing in the morning. How does this make any sense when you haven’t eaten for at least 6-8 hours but during the day you can barely make it past 3 hours between meals?

Screen Shot 2016-07-29 at 12.45.10 PM

Makes you go HMMMMMM??

Well first of all, our metabolism actually slows down when we sleep at night. It goes into it’s own slumber since we aren’t expending much energy while we sleep. When we wake up, it may take some time for our metabolism to get the memo that it’s time to GO! The reason to get breakfast in sooner than later is that it will help to kick-start the metabolism and curbs our appetite throughout the day. It’s not uncommon to struggle more later in the day when we skip breakfast because our bodies are playing catch up. So you’re not low on willpower when you are ravished later in the day..you may just need set up some earlier meal plans.

I recommend planning a nutritious breakfast within 1-2 hours of waking up for best results. Once you start this habit, your body will become accustomed and start to feel hungry when you wake up! (some days, my body WAKES me up from hunger!)

Another common issue that may cause our appetites to fail us in the morning is eating too much before sleep. While there are many arguments on how late to eat before bed, I would suggest eating your final meal of the night at least 2-3 hours before you retire. Eating a heavy meal too close to bedtime can also disrupt our sleep because the body is hard at work digesting that food. (remember point one on our metabolism slowing down to sleep? If it doesn’t, then we don’t sleep either!)

Another reason to refrain from eating that midnight snack is that it can sit in your tummy all night. You may not feel like eating breakfast first thing in the morning because you still have the food sitting in your belly from the night before. It sits and starts to rot. I know…ewwwwww! It may even cause you to feel a bit “hung-over” in the morning. Bottom line? Eat more in your awake hours and slow down a few hours before bedtime for best results overall.

Screen Shot 2016-07-29 at 12.46.23 PM

One more reason you don’t want food in the morning may also be blamed on your hormones. Hormones are responsible for so many strange behaviors in our bodies and can also be tied to the lack of appetite and morning nausea. When we wake up in the morning, the body secretes several different hormones in order to help us wake up and get moving after a night’s rest. Besides giving us the boost we need to get going with a burst of energy, the hormones also raise our blood sugar (kind of important after the ‘fast’ during the night).  This surge of hormones is another reason for that mild nausea when you wake up. An empty stomach can also trigger the morning sickness as it will secrete acids in anticipation of eating food again. Kind of a “catch 22” when the nausea happens as it’s a sign from the body to get some food in there for the acids to work.

So now that you know…what should you do?

I usually tell my clients to not eat when they’re not hungry (duh) but the morning is an exception to that rule. If you’re not hungry when you wake up, it’s tempting to skip eating until you do become hungry…but by then, you’ve already done some minor damage to your metabolism.

Screen Shot 2016-07-29 at 12.48.06 PM

I start the day with a glass of water that I squeeze some lemon juice into. This helps to alkalanize our bodies and rehydrate from the hours of sleep. Within about 10-15 minutes, I am hungry and ready for my breakfast. If you don’t feel hungry within that time, a quick 15 minute walk or fasted steady state cardio session usually does the trick.

So, are you ready to start with these tips today?

Screen Shot 2015-07-15 at 8.10.52 AM